Abstract

Mobile phone technology has increased over the past decade so much that most of the population owns a smart phone or a tablet device. Many applications can be downloaded on these devices. However, limited research exists examining the efficacy and effectiveness of these applications. In addition, attrition rates for these studies are extremely high. This study explored characteristics of the population who would be willing to use an application for help. College students (N=836) in a Midwestern metropolitan area were surveyed to determine if alcohol consumption or depressive symptoms influence an individual's willingness to use an application as an adjunct to psychological treatment. The results showed that depressive symptoms significantly predict an individual's willingness to use a mobile phone application in a positive direction, but alcohol consumption did not. More research needs to be completed to determine the characteristics of the population who would be willing to use applications for mental health assistance.

Advisor

Daniel Houlihan

First Committee Member

Sarah Sifers

Second Committee Member

Christopher Erbes

Date of Degree

2013

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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