Event Title

Mathematical Modeling of Caffeine Dependence Dynamics

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

4-4-2011 11:00 AM

End Date

4-4-2011 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Psychology, Mathematics and Statistics

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Namyong Lee

Mentor's Department

Mathematics and Statistics

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Caffeine is the mostly widely used psychoactive substance in the world. It is estimated that 80% of adults in the United States consume caffeine daily. Tolerance to the psychostimulant effects of caffeine develops quickly for daily users. Regular caffeine use can also cause physical dependence, and a withdrawal syndrome may develop upon cessation of caffeine use. Withdrawal symptoms can include headache, fatigue, drowsiness, and irritability. These withdrawal symptoms, while generally mild compared to the withdrawal syndromes associated with other drugs, can last over a week and are a common reason that people fail in their attempts to discontinue caffeine use. The objective was to mathematically model and simulate blood caffeine levels over time in regular users using compartment modeling. This model can be used to determine an optimal schedule of dosing for those who wish to discontinue their caffeine use while minimizing withdrawal symptoms.

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Apr 4th, 11:00 AM Apr 4th, 12:30 PM

Mathematical Modeling of Caffeine Dependence Dynamics

CSU 204

Caffeine is the mostly widely used psychoactive substance in the world. It is estimated that 80% of adults in the United States consume caffeine daily. Tolerance to the psychostimulant effects of caffeine develops quickly for daily users. Regular caffeine use can also cause physical dependence, and a withdrawal syndrome may develop upon cessation of caffeine use. Withdrawal symptoms can include headache, fatigue, drowsiness, and irritability. These withdrawal symptoms, while generally mild compared to the withdrawal syndromes associated with other drugs, can last over a week and are a common reason that people fail in their attempts to discontinue caffeine use. The objective was to mathematically model and simulate blood caffeine levels over time in regular users using compartment modeling. This model can be used to determine an optimal schedule of dosing for those who wish to discontinue their caffeine use while minimizing withdrawal symptoms.

Recommended Citation

Olsen, Eric and Casey Stamereilers. "Mathematical Modeling of Caffeine Dependence Dynamics." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 4, 2011.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2011/oral-session-05/4