Abstract

HPV is the “most common sexually transmitted infection,” with approximately four out of five sexually active individuals getting infected at some point in their lives (Planned Parenthood, n.d.b, para.1). Cancers of the throat, mouth, cervix, anus, penis, and vagina have all been linked to HPV infections. In addition to being tested for HPV, the utilization of barrier methods and reduction of risky sexual risk behaviors, are the best ways to prevent and treat sexually transmitted infections. This study contributes to existing literature on university students’ knowledge and attitudes about HPV infections and the vaccination. This study was conducted using descriptive, cross-sectional research design. The population for this study included current university students at a large, Midwestern university. A convenience sampling technique was used to obtain students for the study. Instrumentation includes a demographics section, knowledge section in which participants were asked 21 true or false questions, and an attitudes section which consisted of thirteen five-point Likert-scale items. The data collected on completed instruments were entered into Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 25 for data management and analysis (IBM, 2017). The results indicated that most participants have received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine, but few reported completing the vaccine series. Females demonstrated higher HPV infection and vaccine knowledge when compared to males. There was no significant difference between knowledge of HPV infection and vaccine when compared to year in school and major. Attitude score was moderate among participants. There needs to be continuous education among adolescents and parents on HPV infections, and the importance of the HPV vaccine, to decrease HPV infections and the associated consequences.

Advisor

Joseph Visker

Committee Member

Emily Forsyth

Committee Member

Mary Kramer

Date of Degree

2020

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Science

College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Available for download on Saturday, December 05, 2020

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