Abstract

This study explored the academic outcomes of two-year college students who were reinstated following an academic suspension at a small, Midwestern technical college. Binary logistic regression was used to identify factors that were predictive of student reinstatement outcomes (reinstatement success or reinstatement nonsuccess). The analysis included independent variables of age, gender, cumulative quality point status, term of dismissal quality point status, and evidence of a mental health concern. As an independent variable, evidence of a mental health concern was dichotomous (yes or no) and a qualitative review of suspension appeal paperwork submitted by students was used to identify any self-reported or documented evidence of a mental health concern. The overall model, which included all independent variables, was found to be statistically significant and correctly predicted 65.7% of all cases. A significant relationship was also identified between student reinstatement outcomes and the independent variables of age and cumulative quality point status. In accordance with the findings of this study, limitations, recommendations for future research, and implications for future practice are discussed.

Advisor

Diane Coursol

Committee Member

Jacqueline Lewis

Committee Member

Richard Auger

Date of Degree

2020

Language

english

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Counseling and Student Personnel

College

Education

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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In Copyright