Abstract

According to the Centers for Disease control and Prevention (CDC)(2016b), Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most commonly sexually transmitted infection in the United States. HPV is so prevalent that nearly all sexually active people will obtain a strain of HPV at some point in their lives (CDC, 2016d). Approximately one in four Americans are currently infected in the United States with HPV, and approximately 14 million new infections of HPV spread each year in the United States (CDC, 2016b).

Ultimately the HPV vaccination is a form of cancer prevention. With the vaccination uptake, the burden of HPV related health problems could be eliminated. The purpose of this study is to better understand whether college students intend to receive the HPV vaccine or not. By developing a better understanding of college student vaccine intentions, health care professionals will be able to develop appropriate interventions designed to increase the uptake of the HPV vaccine among college students. This will in turn create a reduction of infections and cancers caused by HPV.

There was a significant relationship between participants perceived barriers and their intentions to receive the HPV vaccine. The respondents who had already received the HPV vaccine had fewer perceived barriers then who did not intend to receive the HPV vaccine and those who do intend to receive the HPV vaccine in the future. There was a significant relationship between the participants perceived self-efficacy their intentions to receive the HPV vaccine. The respondents who have already received the HPV vaccine has higher perceptions of self-efficacy then those who did not intend to receive the HPV vaccine and those who do intend to receive the HPV vaccine in the future.

Education will be a key component to break down barriers that prevent college students from receiving the HPV vaccine. Further research should include how to improve self-efficacy as it pertains to the uptake of the HPV vaccine.

Advisor

Marge Murray-Davis

First Committee Member

Joseph Visker

Second Committee Member

Autumn Hamilton

Date of Degree

2018

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Health Science

College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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