Abstract

This quantitative analysis explored measures influencing time to STEM-degree-completion in a correlational, non-experimental analysis of archival data (N = 745). FGCS represent a significant portion of individuals pursuing a post-secondary degree in the United States however, FGCS are less likely to persist to graduation as compared to their continuing-generation peers. FGCS are entering colleges and universities declaring STEM majors yet, are changing their major and or leaving college without a four-year degree (Chen, 2013). FGCS, who identify as female, face additional barriers, whether perceived or actual, in the pursuit of earning a STEM degree. FGCS choose to pursue STEM majors, yet they are less likely to graduate with a STEM degree. A multiple linear regression was performed, and results indicated that time-to-completion was significantly related (R2 = .12, p < .001) to ACT score, Pell-eligibility, PSEO credit, learning community participation, and on-campus employment. For students who identified as female, (N = 209) time-to-completion was also significantly related (R2 = .26, p < .001) to ACT score, Pell-eligibility, PSEO credit, and on-campus employment. For students who identified as female, (N = 209) time-to-completion was not significantly related (R2 = .07, p = .18) to the type of STEM major.

Advisor

Jacqueline Lewis

Committee Member

Diane Coursol

Committee Member

Walter Roberts

Committee Member

Kerry Diekmann

Date of Degree

2019

Language

english

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Counseling and Student Personnel

College

Education

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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