Abstract

Depression, anxiety, and other comorbid psychological conditions are commonly found in child sex trafficking victims (Basson et al., 2012; Cole et al., 2016; Cook et al., 2018; Hargreaves-Cormany & Patterson, 2016; Hossain et al., 2010; Hopper, 2017; Middleton et al., 2018; Pierce, 2012; Reid, 2018; Shaw et al., 2017). Given the likelihood that mental health professionals may encounter victims of child sex trafficking, it is necessary to have a comprehensive and universal understanding of sex trafficking in order to most effectively address victims’ needs through evidence-based practices and inventions. The purpose of this study was to gain a more informed understanding of how child sex trafficking is being defined in the psychological literature. A systematic review of the 21 articles revealed that child sex trafficking is not universally conceptualized with varying and narrow definitions being used as guidelines. These findings inform and highlight the need for a universal, operational definition of child sex trafficking to better assess and serve the needs of victims.

Advisor

Eric Sprankle

Date of Degree

2020

Language

english

Document Type

APP

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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In Copyright