Event Title

Anti-Japanese Propaganda in the United States During World War II: Characteristics and Effects

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Art

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Gina Wenger

Mentor's Email Address

gina.wenger@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Art

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

When examining various political movements, it is beneficial to examine the propaganda associated with each movement. This is especially true regarding the Japanese American internment process that occurred in the United States from 1942 to 1946. In order to better understand this process, I investigated the characteristics of the anti-Japanese propaganda produced in the United States during this time period and how the propaganda affected those who came into contact with it. In order to do so, I analyzed anti-Japanese propaganda posters and reviewed prerecorded interviews. Based on this information, I found that the anti-Japanese propaganda negatively affected those who came into contact with it, whether they were of Japanese descent or whether they had never previously come into contact with a person of Japanese descent. After combining all of these aspects, my hypothesis is that the anti-Japanese propaganda created and reinforced the attitudes that allowed the Japanese American internment camps to exist.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:30 PM

Anti-Japanese Propaganda in the United States During World War II: Characteristics and Effects

CSU Ballroom

When examining various political movements, it is beneficial to examine the propaganda associated with each movement. This is especially true regarding the Japanese American internment process that occurred in the United States from 1942 to 1946. In order to better understand this process, I investigated the characteristics of the anti-Japanese propaganda produced in the United States during this time period and how the propaganda affected those who came into contact with it. In order to do so, I analyzed anti-Japanese propaganda posters and reviewed prerecorded interviews. Based on this information, I found that the anti-Japanese propaganda negatively affected those who came into contact with it, whether they were of Japanese descent or whether they had never previously come into contact with a person of Japanese descent. After combining all of these aspects, my hypothesis is that the anti-Japanese propaganda created and reinforced the attitudes that allowed the Japanese American internment camps to exist.

Recommended Citation

Lancette, Lindsey. "Anti-Japanese Propaganda in the United States During World War II: Characteristics and Effects." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_B/2